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Child Seat Fitting Station

Child Seat Fitting Station

                “THE RIGHT SEAT” For children ages 1 to 13, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death. From 2012 to 2016, 3,268 children age 12 and younger were killed in passenger vehicle traffic crashes. The Child Passenger Safety campaign seeks to educate and remind parents and caregivers with children under 12 that car seats, booster seats and seat belts save lives and offer the best protection for children in crashes. Parents should ask themselves “Is my child as safe as possible in the car?” and make sure that their children are riding in the right car seat for their age and size as they grow.   “Child Seat Fitting Stations” We are proud to announce that the City of Martin Fire/Rescue Department now have certified technicians in child seat safety. We have certified staff on duty every day. If you are in need of having your child seat checked to make sure it is installed properly you may call Fire Station 1 at 587-4919. Ask to speak to Training Officer Kory Green for more information and he will set a time for you to come...

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Flooding Safety

Flooding Safety

If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around, and go another way. Never try to walk, swim, or drive through swift water. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. If water is moving swiftly, even water six inches deep can sweep you off your feet. It takes just twelve inches of rushing water to carry away a small car, while two feet of rushing water can carry away most vehicles. It is NEVER safe to drive or walk into flood waters. Almost half of all flash flood deaths happen in vehicles. Remember the phrase “Turn Around, Don’t Drown” if you are driving during a flood event and follow these tips: – Avoid already flooded areas, and areas subject to sudden flooding. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. The depth of water is not always obvious. The roadbed may be washed out under the water, and you could be stranded or trapped. Rapidly rising water may stall the engine, engulf the vehicle and its occupants, and sweep them away. Look out for flooding at highway dips, bridges, and low areas. – If you are driving and come upon rapidly rising waters, turn around and find another route. Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. If your route is blocked by flood waters or barricades, find another route. Barricades are put up by local officials to protect people from unsafe roads. Driving around them can be a serious risk. – If your vehicle becomes surrounded by water or the engine stalls, and if you can safely get out, abandon your vehicle immediately and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles. When a vehicle stalls in the water, the water’s momentum is transferred to the car. The lateral force of a foot of water moving at 10 miles per hour is about 500 pounds on the average automobile. The greatest effect is buoyancy – for every foot that water rises up the side of a car, it displaces 1,500 pounds of the car’s weight. So, two feet of water moving at 10 miles per hour will float virtually any car. Many persons...

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Fire Academy Mobile Training Tower

Fire Academy Mobile Training Tower

              The City of Martin Fire/Rescue recently hosted the Tennessee Fire Academy’s mobile training tower in July. This tower travels all over the state so that firefighters can train on different types of firefighting techniques. Fire personnel participated in an eight hour course is designed to prepare the firefighter for a Emergency Egress Bailout of the modern day fire ground. Students learned from real world incidents in which firefighters were injured or killed in the line of duty while operating at structure fires. The course test the students both mentally and physically.   training IMG_20180712_123954035_HDR IMG_20180712_123748806_HDR IMG_20180712_122014882_HDR IMG_20180712_121943807_HDR IMG_20180712_121630794_HDR IMG_20180712_121613315_HDR IMG_20180712_121358899_HDR IMG_20180712_121355478_HDR IMG_20180712_121134703_HDR IMG_20180712_121130684_HDR IMG_20180712_120852587_HDR IMG_20180712_120608404_HDR IMG_20180712_120558637_HDR IMG_20180712_120547407_HDR IMG_20180712_120224304_HDR IMG_20180712_120220683 IMG_5876 IMG_5859 IMG_5858 IMG_5857 IMG_5856 IMG_5855 IMG_5854 IMG_5852 IMG_5852-1 IMG_5851 IMG_5850 IMG_5849 IMG_5848...

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FREE Smoke Alarms

FREE Smoke Alarms

  The City of Martin Fire/Rescue Department would like for you to know that we still have smoke alarms for anyone who needs them. This programs is sponsored by the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office. Below are the numbers since the program started:   Over 119,000 smoke alarms distributed 473 participating fire departments 170 homes per week  139 documented alerts & saves from “Get Alarmed” smoke alarms – See more at: https://tn.gov/commerce/article/fire-get-alarmed#sthash.t0S3Xbwn.dpuf  ...

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Follow Us on Twitter

Follow Us on Twitter

The City of Martin Fire/Rescue is on Twitter. Go and follow us for our tweets.  https://twitter.com/martinfiredept                                                                                                                                  ...

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Live Audio Feed

Live Audio Feed

Our radio channel is now broadcasted live on the internet. Check us out at  http://www.broadcastify.com/listen/feed/20424                                                    ...

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